11.01.16

The Water Cooler Union of Concerned Computer Scientists

Posted in Culture of Lickspittle, Cyberterrorism, Phlogiston at 11:30 am by George Smith

“[A] small, tightly knit community of computer scientists who pursue such work—some at cybersecurity firms, some in academia, some with close ties to three-letter federal agencies—is also spurred by a sense of shared idealism and considers itself the benevolent posse that chases off the rogues and rogue states that try to purloin sensitive data and infect the internet with their bugs,” it reads at Slate.

Important stuff! “A Union of Concerned Nerds” are about to explain how they almost discovered Donald J. Trump was in league with Russia!

“We wanted to help defend both campaigns, because we wanted to preserve the integrity of the election,” explained one of the academicians who, naturally, wished to remain anonymous.

One of the defenders of election integrity, nicknamed Tea Leaves (BTW, Tea Leaves is Cockney slang for “thieves,” which I lernt from watching The Limey)

They soon began “scrutinizing” a computer in Moscow, from a bank, that was connecting with Donald J. Trump’s domain “in a strange way.” Strange ways on the internet…

The information and data was passed on to a man named Vixie. There was “no higher authority” when it came to this kind of thing.

The transmissions of the suspicious computer in Moscow were deemed indeed very suspicious.

“The data has got the right kind of fuzz growing on it,” according to Vixie, as told to the reporter. It’s the interpacket gap, the spacing between the conversations, the total volume.”

Growing fuzz. Interpacket gap.

What could be going on? Influence peddling and other skullduggeries yet to be determined, but suspiciously, very suspiciously, tied to events in the election cycle, like the days between two debates!

You could read it here. Or just go to the NY Times and skip the jargon and fog of cyberwar:

F.B.I. officials spent weeks examining computer data showing an odd stream of activity to a Trump Organization server and Alfa Bank. Computer logs obtained by The New York Times show that two servers at Alfa Bank sent more than 2,700 “look-up” messages — a first step for one system’s computers to talk to another — to a Trump-connected server beginning in the spring. But the F.B.I. ultimately concluded that there could be an innocuous explanation, like a marketing email or spam, for the computer contacts.

“Agents scrutinized advisers close to Donald J. Trump, looked for financial connections with Russian financial figures, searched for those involved in hacking the computers of Democrats, and even chased a lead — which they ultimately came to doubt — about a possible secret channel of email communication from the Trump Organization to a Russian bank,” reads a sentence from the top of the story.

Oh well. With a week to go democracy still needs saving. Damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead.


Listen for the “hee’s” and sinister theme invoking the terror of cyberwar near the end.

Comments are closed.